Dating vintage mail order patterns

Rated 3.86/5 based on 840 customer reviews

6TH ROUND: A shell in first shell, * ch 4, skip chain loop, 6 tr in next chain loop, ch 4, skip chain loop, (always working shells in chain loop of shells below) work a shell in next shell; repeat from * around ending with ch 4, a sl st in top st of first ch 4.7TH ROUND: A shell in first shell, * ch 4, skip chain loop, 2 tr in next tr, 1 tr in each of 4 tr, 2 tr in next tr, ch 4, a shell in next shell; repeat from * around ending with ch 4, a sl st in top st of first ch 4.12TH ROUND: A shell in first shell, * ch 5, a shell in next shell, skip next chain loop, (ch 6 and 1 sc) in 4 chain loops, ch 6, a shell in next shell; repeat from * around ending as last round.13TH ROUND: A shell in first shell, * ch 5, 5 tr in center st of next chain loop, ch 5, a shell in next shell, skip a chain loop, (ch 6 and 1 sc) in 3 chain loops, ch 6, a shell in shell; repeat from * around, end as before.Patterns were often offered through newspapers and magazines features via mail order.

3RD ROUND: A sl st in next tr, ch 1, 1 sc in same st as last sl st, * ch 7, skip next 2 tr, 1 sc in next tr; repeat from * around ending with ch 7, a sl st in first sc of round.Vintage patterns get a bad rap for being extremely difficult to fit, but they're really no worse than modern patterns, I think.The big differences are 1) patterns were not multi-sized (there's only one size per pattern envelope) so you can't grade between sizes, 2) lack of availability, especially on the larger end of the sizing spectrum, 3) and changes in fashion silhouette that affect ease.The first commercially produced sewing patterns were designed in the mid-1800s by an American milliner named Ellen Curtis Demorest.With her husband, William Jenning Demorest, she founded a company to bring au courant French fashions to the United States via sewing.

Leave a Reply